Demon Slayer: Tsuguko, Kanao Tsuyuri

Akihabara News (Tokyo) — In the twenty-fifth episode of Demon Slayer: Kimetsu no Yaiba, Tanjiro completes his training, while Inosuke and Zenitsu try to catch up after missing several sessions.

The episode begins with Tanjiro requesting the Kocho triplets to help keep him in check and gives them permission to hit him if he ever falters his Total Concentration Breathing.

Tanjiro continues his training with full intensity and he finally manages to catch Tsuyuri during the game of tag. which is testament to his intense training.

For a while longer, Inosuke and Zenitsu continue to bail on their training. Shinobu Kocho comes in and tells them that she believes in them and that they should join Tanjiro in his training. She manages to convince them.

Kanao Tsuyuri’s back story is explored. Her parents had sold her to a random man for money and she started feeling numb, so that she would not feel pain. As he takes her home, Shinobu and her older sister take notice of her and purchase her from the man.

Tsuyuri stays silent as the sisters bathe and take her under their care. Shinobu gets frustrated that Tsuyuri is unable to make her own decisions, she even has to be told to eat or else she does not. She thinks the girl is useless. Her sister remains patient. She gives Tsuyuri a coin that she was told to flip every time she faces a decision.

The boys receive their new blades forged by Hotaru Haganezuka. He blames them for breaking their Nichirin Blades and tries to attack them. Inosuke starts smashing his own blades with a rock to give them the ridges like his old sword, and Haganezuka nearly kills him for it.

Tanjiro gets progressively stronger from his training, while Inosuke and Zenitsu rush to catch up.

Shinobu deems Tanjiro fit to graduate from his training during a check up. During the check up Tanjiro inquires about flame breathing, and she says that she has only ever heard of flame breathing from Rengoku the Flame Hashira.

However, Rengoku is away on a mission and Shinobu tells Tanjiro to wait until he gets back to ask him about it.

Tanjiro continues having one-sided conversations with Nezuko as she sleeps. He vows to save her and kill all the demons.

The episode ends with a scene from a train where a large demon is consuming people. It is the mission Rengoku the Flame Hashira was assigned to.

Previous Articles

Demon Slayer: Cruelty

Demon Slayer: Trainer Sakonji Urokodaki

Demon Slayer: Sabito and Makomo

Demon Slayer: Final Selection

Demon Slayer: My Own Steel

Demon Slayer: Swordsman Accompanying Demon

Demon Slayer: Muzan Kibutsuji

Demon Slayer: Smell of Enchanting Blood

Demon Slayer: Temari and Arrow Demon

Demon Slayer: Together Forever

Demon Slayer: Tsuzumi Mansion

Demon Slayer: The Boar Bares Its Fangs

Demon Slayer: More Important Than Life

Demon Slayer: House with Wisteria Crest

Demon Slayer: Mount Natagumo

Demon Slayer: Let Someone Go First

Demon Slayer: Master a Single Thing

Demon Slayer: A Forged Bond

Demon Slayer: Hinokami

Demon Slayer: Pretend Family

Demon Slayer: Against Corps Rules

Demon Slayer: Master of the Mansion

Demon Slayer: Hashira Meeting

Demon Slayer: Rehabilitation Training

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Japan and Russia Eye Clean Energy

Akihabara News (Tokyo) — The Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) and the Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC) have agreed to work with Russia’s largest independent natural gas producer, PAO Novatek, on developing low-carbon energy projects.

The agreement was announced during the Eastern Economic Forum in Vladivostok on September 2.

The pact specifically outlines collaboration on initiatives concerning blue ammonia, hydrogen, and carbon capture, utilization, and storage.

According to Novatek, the parties will “mutually support projects in producing and marketing of ammonia and hydrogen, as well as implementing technologies for carbon capture and storage in Russia and Japan.”

Novatek CEO Leonid Mikhelson commented, “One of the most important elements of our strategy is to reduce our carbon footprint.”

Novatek plans to do so through increasing gas sales as a “part of the future energy mix” as opposed to a “transition fuel.”

The collaboration will facilitate opportunities for Novatek to market clean fuel products to Japanese consumers with the aim of reducing total carbon emissions, as well as to attract investments from Japanese companies and financial institutions.

In July 2020, Japan received a shipment of liquefied natural gas (LNG) from Novatek under a spot contract, part of its Yamal LNG project. The recent collaboration secures future ventures in LNG and other low-carbon initiatives.

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Valve moves Dota 2 International to Romania, adds mask-and-vax rules

Valve moves Dota 2 International to Romania, adds mask-and-vax rules

Enlarge

Valve announced this week that its prestigious Dota 2 tournament The International will require all attendees to be fully masked and vaccinated for entry.

As noted on the Dota 2 site, anyone attending the October competition at the National Arena in Bucharest, Romania, must be at least 10 days out from their final vaccination, and attendees will need to present proof of inoculation (which must be in either English or Romanian) along with a photo ID to gain access to the event grounds and tournament arena. All attendees must also wear a mask and proof-of-vaccination wristband along with their registration badges. Additional safety protocols will be put into place throughout the tournament.

Now in its tenth year, The International gathers together the best Dota 2 teams from around the globe to compete for a multi-million dollar prize pool.  But over the past year, Valve has not had an easy time with COVID-related restrictions for its annual tournament. The company’s initial plans to hold The International 10 in Stockholm were scrapped earlier this summer after the Swedish Sports Federation decided not to include esports in its officially recognized body—a move that meant anyone traveling for the tournament would be denied an entry visa.

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Source: Ars Technica – Valve moves Dota 2 International to Romania, adds mask-and-vax rules

FDA advisors green-light Pfizer boosters for people 65+ and at-risk groups

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Source: Ars Technica – FDA advisors green-light Pfizer boosters for people 65+ and at-risk groups

SpaceX’s Starlink will come out of beta next month, Elon Musk says

Screenshot from the SpaceX Starlink pre-order website.

Enlarge / Screenshot from the Starlink order page, with the street address blotted out. (credit: SpaceX Starlink)

SpaceX’s Starlink satellite-broadband service will emerge from beta in October, CEO Elon Musk said last night. Musk provided the answer of “next month” in response to a Twitter user who asked when Starlink will come out of beta.

SpaceX began sending email invitations to Starlink’s public beta in October 2020. The service is far from perfect, as trees can disrupt the line-of-sight connections to satellites and the satellite dishes go into “thermal shutdown” in hot areas. But for people in areas where wired ISPs have never deployed cable or fiber, Starlink is still a promising alternative, and service should improve as SpaceX launches more satellites and refines its software.

SpaceX has said it is serving over 100,000 Starlink users in a dozen countries from more than 1,700 satellites. The company has been taking preorders for post-beta service and said in May that “over half a million people have placed an order or put down a deposit for Starlink.”

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Source: Ars Technica – SpaceX’s Starlink will come out of beta next month, Elon Musk says

Astronomers solve centuries-old mystery of supernova observed in 1181

Hubble Space Telescope mosaic image of the Crab Nebula, a six-light-year-wide expanding remnant of a star's supernova explosion in 1054 CE

Enlarge / Hubble Space Telescope mosaic image of the Crab Nebula, a six-light-year-wide expanding remnant of a star’s supernova explosion in 1054 CE (credit: NASA/ESA/J. Hester & A. Loll (Arizona State University)

In August 1181, astronomers in China and Japan witnessed a bright “guest star” in the night sky that we now know to have been a supernova—one of just a handful of recorded supernovae in our Milky Way that were visible to the naked eye. It shone brightly for a full six months before it disappeared. Astronomers haven’t been able to identify the remnant of the source for SN 1181 for centuries, and that detail is crucial to determine which class the supernova belongs to. Now, an international team of astronomers think they have pinpointed that source as one of the hottest stars in the galaxy within the Pa30 nebula, according to a new paper published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters.

As we’ve written previously, there are two types of known supernova, depending on the mass of the original star. An iron-core collapse supernova occurs with massive stars (greater than ten solar masses), which collapse so violently that it causes a huge, catastrophic explosion. The temperatures and pressures become so high that the carbon in the star’s core begins to fuse. This halts the core’s collapse, at least temporarily, and this process continues, over and over, with progressively heavier atomic nuclei. When the fuel finally runs out entirely, the (by then) iron core collapses into a black hole or a neutron star.

Then there is a thermonuclear supernova. Smaller stars (up to about eight solar masses) gradually cool to become dense cores of ash known as white dwarfs. If a white dwarf that has run out of nuclear fuel is part of a binary system, it can siphon off matter from its partner, adding to its mass until its core reaches high enough temperatures for carbon fusion to occur. 

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Source: Ars Technica – Astronomers solve centuries-old mystery of supernova observed in 1181

The iPhone 13, 13 mini, 13 Pro, and 13 Pro Max are available to order today

As previously announced, Apple’s new lineup of flagship iPhones is available to pre-order today through the company’s online store.

The new phones include the iPhone 13, iPhone 13 mini, iPhone 13 Pro, and iPhone 13 Pro Max. Prices range from $699 all the way up to $1,599, with storage configurations ranging from 128GB to 1TB across the line.

The originally stated ship date for these phones was September 24, but unsurprisingly, the dates have slipped back, depending on which phone you’re trying to buy.

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Source: Ars Technica – The iPhone 13, 13 mini, 13 Pro, and 13 Pro Max are available to order today

The FAA releases initial report on Boca Chica launches, and it’s not terrible

Photograph from beneath a giant rocket component.

Enlarge / SpaceX’s Booster 4 is lifted onto its orbital launch mount in South Texas. (credit: Elon Musk/Twitter)

The Federal Aviation Administration released a draft environmental review of SpaceX’s plans for orbital launches from South Texas on Friday, kicking off a 30-day public comment period.

The long-awaited procedural step is the first of several regulatory hurdles that SpaceX must clear before obtaining final permission to launch its Super Heavy booster and Starship upper stage from a site near Boca Chica, Texas. Such a launch likely remains months away, but it now appears that the feds will ultimately greenlight South Texas for orbital launches. That seemed far from assured before today.

The document, formally called a Draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment, evaluates the potential environmental impacts of SpaceX’s Starship program, including launch and reentry. It also reviews debris recovery, the integration tower and other launch-related construction, and local road closures between Brownsville and Boca Chica beach.

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Source: Ars Technica – The FAA releases initial report on Boca Chica launches, and it’s not terrible

Volkswagen’s electric ID.4 was already good—does AWD change that?

CHATTANOOGA, TENN.—Volkswagen in 2021 seems like a rather different company than Volkswagen circa 2015. The company has transformed itself in the wake of dieselgate, and it’s found forgiveness in the arms of American consumers as evidenced by skyrocketing SUV sales. VW has also thrown itself wholeheartedly into electrification, applying the approach of a highly modular platform that can be used to build a range of battery electric vehicles including hatchbacks considered too small for the US and that electric bus everyone loves so much.

In North America, the ID.4 is the tip of the electric spear, an electric crossover that’s pitched perfectly at our automotive mode du jour. We’ve already driven the ID.4 a couple of times: briefly as a pre-production prototype, then for a couple of days on home turf. It wasn’t particularly flashy, and there were a couple of things that needed tweaking. Yet, overall, we were impressed. (And we weren’t alone.)

At launch, the ID.4 was only available in a single configuration: an 82 kWh (gross, 77 kWh useable) lithium-ion battery powering a 201 hp (150 kW), 229 lb-ft (310 Nm) permanent magnet synchronous electric motor at the rear axle. But American car buyers like power, and they love all-wheel drive (for potentially misguided reasons about traction and grip, but that’s neither here nor there).

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Source: Ars Technica – Volkswagen’s electric ID.4 was already good—does AWD change that?

Apple and Google cave to Putin’s censors, block Navalny app as election begins

At an Anti-Putin protest in Berlin, a giant sculpture depicts Alexei Navalny kicking Vladimir Putin in the groin.

Enlarge / A sculpture of Russian opposition leader and anti-corruption activist Alexei Navalny in front of the Brandenburg Gate at an anti-Putin demonstration on May 9, 2021 in Berlin, Germany. (credit: Getty Images | Adam Berry )

Apple and Google gave a boost to Russian President Vladimir Putin’s ruling party by removing a strategic voting app developed by activists who support the jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny. The app, called “Navalny,” was kicked off the mobile app stores ahead of this weekend’s legislative election as Apple and Google caved to pressure from the Russian government.

“Removing the Navalny app from stores is a shameful act of political censorship. Russia’s authoritarian government and propaganda will be thrilled,” Ivan Zhdanov, who is director of the Navalny-founded Anti-Corruption Foundation and a politician in the Russia of the Future opposition party, wrote on Twitter. While candidates associated with Navalny are banned from the election, the Navalny app was designed to help voters coalesce around opposition candidates who are on the ballot.

As noted by NBC News, the now-removed “tactical voting app allows voters who do not want President [Vladimir] Putin’s ruling political party, United Russia, to win the election to organize around a single opposition candidate in each of the 225 electoral districts in an effort to boost the number of non-Kremlin-approved politicians in power.” Since mid-August, the Russian government has “threatened Apple and Google with fines if they didn’t remove Navalny’s tactical voting app from the App Store and Google Play store,” NBC News wrote.

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Source: Ars Technica – Apple and Google cave to Putin’s censors, block Navalny app as election begins

RIP Sir Clive Sinclair, creator of UK’s famed ZX Spectrum gaming computer

Sir Clive Sinclair holding the world's smallest television screen when it was created by Sinclair Radionics in 1977.

Enlarge / Sir Clive Sinclair holding the world’s smallest television screen when it was created by Sinclair Radionics in 1977. (credit: Getty Images)

Sir Clive Sinclair, the namesake of a British electronics manufacturer who helped pioneer Europe’s microcomputing boom, is dead at the age of 81.

His company, Sinclair Radionics, is arguably best known around the world for 1982’s ZX Spectrum, an early example of a computer capable of multi-color, real-time graphics. The device dominated the UK and other European territories in the early 1980s. This computer was a major processing step up from black-and-white Spectrum computers like ZX80 and ZX81, and it debuted in a configuration priced as low as £125. American readers probably best know this platform thanks to popular and ambitious ZX Spectrum games from the little developer Ultimate: Play The Game. That company eventually rebranded itself as Rareware and turned into a ’90s powerhouse on Nintendo consoles.

Yet before his name became interminably linked to gaming history, Sinclair’s rise to running his own electronics manufacturing company largely resembles the stories of American electronics pioneers who began as garage hobbyists. A BBC documentary, Clive Sinclair: The Pace Setters, chronicles the inventor’s rise, which began with him selling one-at-a-time radio kits via mail order in the 1960s.

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Source: Ars Technica – RIP Sir Clive Sinclair, creator of UK’s famed ZX Spectrum gaming computer

Android 6 and up will start stripping unused apps’ permissions

Android 6.0 Marshmallow is getting a spiffy new feature.

Enlarge / Android 6.0 Marshmallow is getting a spiffy new feature. (credit: Ron Amadeo)

Google is coming for your unused Android crapware. The company announced Friday that it will backport an Android 11 privacy feature—auto-resetting app permissions—to Android 6.

Auto-resetting app permissions were introduced in Android 11 as part of a continually expanding Android feature set aiming to automatically limit apps you don’t use. When you don’t use an app for a set period of time, Android will automatically strip the app of any permissions it has been granted, limiting it from tracking you in the background or accessing data. It’s a nice feature for less tech-savvy people who aren’t interested in manually organizing the inner workings of their phones. If you open the app again, it can ask for all of those permissions again.

Like most new Android features, auto-resetting permissions were exclusive to Android 11 when it came out last year—making up a very small number of Android’s 3 billion active devices. Google’s official Android Studio stats have Android 11 at 0 percent market share, but that chart hasn’t been updated since Android 11 came out (update your chart, Google!). The last update we got said OEMs were pushing out Android 11 about as quickly as they rolled out Android 10, so today, version 11 might be cracking 10 percent of Android devices.

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Source: Ars Technica – Android 6 and up will start stripping unused apps’ permissions

Facebook forced troll farm content on over 40% of all Americans each month

Facebook forced troll farm content on over 40% of all Americans each month

Enlarge (credit: Chesnot | Getty Images)

In the wake of the 2016 election, Facebook knew it had a problem. Pages and fake accounts created by the Kremlin-backed Internet Research Agency had spread through the social network and drawn massive engagement from real users. Facebook knew it had to get things under control.

But years later, Facebook’s own internal research teams revealed that troll farms were still reaching massive audiences, even if they didn’t have large direct followings. The company’s own algorithms pushed the troll content onto users who had not expressed interest in the pages, expanding the trolls’ reach exponentially. A report detailing the research was leaked to MIT Technology Review by a former employee.

When the report was published in 2019, troll farms were reaching 100 million Americans and 360 million people worldwide every week. In any given month, Facebook was showing troll farm posts to 140 million Americans. Most of the users never followed any of the pages. Rather, Facebook’s content-recommendation algorithms had forced the content on over 100 million Americans weekly. “A big majority of their ability to reach our users comes from the structure of our platform and our ranking algorithms rather than user choice,” the report said.

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Source: Ars Technica – Facebook forced troll farm content on over 40% of all Americans each month

36,000 gigatons of carbon heralded history’s biggest mass extinction

Image of a large ridge made of volcanic rock.

Enlarge / Some of the massive volcanic deposits that are part of the Siberian Traps. (credit: MIT)

The end-Permian mass extinction was a big deal. It was the largest mass extinction event ever and occurred 252 million years ago. A whopping 90 percent of all marine species and around 70 percent of their terrestrial kin were killed off.

Over the years, there have been numerous efforts to look into this massive, world-changing event. The end-Permian mass extinction was coincident with mass eruptions in the Siberian Traps, and some potential scenarios include volcanism driving acid rain, volcanism triggering the burning of coal (which released greenhouses gases into the atmosphere), and a reduction in the availability of oxygen in the ocean, among others. However, a new paper relies on previously unused data and modeling to dig into the matter.

In all, the study found that 36,000 gigatons of carbon—mostly from volcanic sources—were released into the atmosphere over a relatively short span of 15,000 years. This period also saw the global average temperature rise a staggering amount, from 25ºC to 40ºC. While researchers previously explored volcanism and carbon as potential causes for the massive extinction, this work provides more insight into the event, said Wolfram Kürschner, a geologist at the University of Oslo and one of the authors of the paper.

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Source: Ars Technica – 36,000 gigatons of carbon heralded history’s biggest mass extinction

Cryptocurrency launchpad hit by $3 million supply chain attack

Cryptocurrency launchpad hit by $3 million supply chain attack

Enlarge (credit: Austin Distel)

SushiSwap’s chief technology officer says the company’s MISO platform has been hit by a software supply chain attack. SushiSwap is a community-driven decentralized finance (DeFi) platform that lets users swap, earn, lend, borrow, and leverage cryptocurrency assets all from one place. Launched earlier this year, Sushi’s newest offering, Minimal Initial SushiSwap Offering (MISO), is a token launchpad that lets projects launch their own tokens on the Sushi network.

Unlike cryptocurrency coins that need a native blockchain and substantive groundwork, DeFi tokens are an easier alternative to implement, as they can function on an existing blockchain. For example, anybody can create their own “digital tokens” on top of the Ethereum blockchain without having to recreate a new cryptocurrency altogether.

Attacker steals $3 million in Ethereum via one GitHub commit

In a Twitter thread today, SushiSwap CTO Joseph Delong announced that an auction on MISO launchpad had been hijacked via a supply chain attack. An “anonymous contractor” with the GitHub handle AristoK3 and access to the project’s code repository had pushed a malicious code commit that was distributed on the platform’s front-end.

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Source: Ars Technica – Cryptocurrency launchpad hit by million supply chain attack

Dell XPS 15 9510 review: Come for the screen, stay for everything else

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Source: Ars Technica – Dell XPS 15 9510 review: Come for the screen, stay for everything else

Telegram emerges as new dark web for cyber criminals

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Source: Ars Technica – Telegram emerges as new dark web for cyber criminals

Rocket Report: Virgin Galactic delays flight, Falcon Heavy nets NASA mission

Light streaks across the sky.

Enlarge / Inspiration4 reflected in the shores of the St. Johns River on the space coast of Florida. (credit: Trevor Mahlmann / Ars Technica)

Welcome to Edition 4.16 of the Rocket Report! We’ve experienced an inspiring week of spaceflight thanks to the launch of the Inspiration4 mission on Wednesday, but there is much more happening around the world when it comes to launch.

As always, we welcome reader submissions, and if you don’t want to miss an issue, please subscribe using the box below (the form will not appear on AMP-enabled versions of the site). Each report will include information on small-, medium-, and heavy-lift rockets as well as a quick look ahead at the next three launches on the calendar.

Virgin Galactic delays next flight. The space tourism company said Friday that it was delaying the next flight of its VSS Unity vehicle to no earlier than mid-October. As a reason, Virgin Galactic said, “During preparation for the Unity 23 test flight, a third-party supplier recently flagged a potential manufacturing defect in a component of the flight control actuation system that they supply to Virgin Galactic.”

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Source: Ars Technica – Rocket Report: Virgin Galactic delays flight, Falcon Heavy nets NASA mission

Sir Clive Sinclair, 1940-2021

It’s an incredibly sad day for the British computing industry.

We’re always going to be very grateful to Sir Clive for being one of the founding fathers of the UK home computing boom that helped so many of us at Raspberry Pi get hooked on programming as kids.

He was someone from whom the business behind Raspberry Pi has drawn great inspiration. He’ll be very sadly missed.

sir clive sinclair

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Source: Raspberry Pi – Sir Clive Sinclair, 1940-2021

Miwo Japanese Cursive Recognition App

Akihabara News (Tokyo) — Tarin Clanuwat, a research scientist for the Google Brain Tokyo team, has been developing a mobile phone application to recognize cursive classical Japanese (kuzushiji) as modern Japanese text.

Although the technology for computers to read printed and handwritten characters (OCR) has been used since the 1960s, kuzushiji has a lack of clear character breaks and is often intricately laid out around pictures, making it much more difficult to read.

Consequently, only about 0.01% of the Japanese population can read kuzushiji fluently.

Miwo, an AI cursive script recognition app developed by Clanuwat and her team, uses deep learning and datasets to translate Japanese cursive into modern Japanese text, making classical Japanese texts more accessible.

Miwo utilizes the ROIS-DS Center for Open Data in the Humanities’ (CODH) KuroNet kuzushiji recognition system, trained on the kuzushiji dataset created by the National Institute of Japanese Literature.

Users can either upload photos from their mobile phone camera roll or use their camera in the app and the translated cursive text will be overlaid on the original photo.

Specific characters can be highlighted and selected, opening a menu which shows other similar-looking characters, and users can also access a dataset of the selected character as it appears in different classical texts.

The app has some accessibility features, such as text size and colored boxes to separate the cursive characters, making them more discernible from each other.

The user can edit and annotate any of the translated text as they see fit, as well as copy the text and conveniently paste it into another application.

The translated photos can also be saved in the app for easy reference or if the user wishes to continue editing the translation.

Bungaku Report suggests that miwo in its current state can read about 80% of well-organized texts from the Edo period, and around 60% of handwritten manuscripts.

Miwo is free of charge and has surpassed 16,000 downloads as of September 6.

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Source: Akihabara News – Miwo Japanese Cursive Recognition App