Chinese Woman Busted Faking Pregnancy At Customs Smuggling A Belly Full Of Intel CPUs

Chinese Woman Busted Faking Pregnancy At Customs Smuggling A Belly Full Of Intel CPUs
Surgeries don’t often happen in the airport, but one woman was lucky enough to have a “CPU C-section” of sorts, thanks to airport security. In a case of truth certainly being stranger than fiction, a woman in China was discovered pretending to be pregnant in an attempt to smuggle over 200 Intel Alder Lake CPUs and several Apple iPhones back

Source: Hot Hardware – Chinese Woman Busted Faking Pregnancy At Customs Smuggling A Belly Full Of Intel CPUs

OpenAI ChatGPT Bot Is Available For You To Test And It’s Freakishly Good And Fun

OpenAI ChatGPT Bot Is Available For You To Test And It’s Freakishly Good And Fun
OpenAI ChatGPT is a chatbot that can help you write code, a poem, or tell you how to decorate your new house. While it does have limitations, it seems to be very good at things like carrying on a conversation, engaging in philosophical discussions, and much more.

OpenAI is an AI research and deployment company with a mission of ensuring

Source: Hot Hardware – OpenAI ChatGPT Bot Is Available For You To Test And It’s Freakishly Good And Fun

Judge dismisses indictment against Huawei exec Meng Wanzhou

More than four years after her arrest, the drawn-out legal saga of Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou came to a formal end this week. On Friday, US District Judge Ann Donnelly dismissed an indictment against Meng, according to Reuters. On behalf of the US, Canadian authorities arrested Meng in 2018 for allegedly violating American sanctions against Iran. Meng, who is also the daughter of Huawei founder and CEO Ren Zhengfei, spent the next three years fighting attempts to extradite her to the US, where she faced up to 30 years in prison for bank and wire fraud charges. Donnelly dismissed the indictment “with prejudice,” meaning the Justice Department can’t bring the same charges against Meng again.

Before entering into an agreement with US prosecutors last year, Meng spent three years under house arrest. The detainment strained relationships between the United States and China and led to an international incident. China apprehended two Canadians, Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig, within days of Meng’s arrest. They were later released after Meng entered into a deferred prosecution agreement with the Justice Department. As part of the agreement, she acknowledged having made false statements about Huawei’s business in Iran. Meng flew home to China the day Donnelly approved the pact.

Huawei and its subsidiaries are still facing charges in the US. Most notably, the Justice Department recently announced charges against two Chinese spies who had allegedly tried to interfere in a criminal investigation into the company. Earlier this week, the FCC also banned telecom and video surveillance equipment from Huawei, among a handful of other Chinese companies. Meng currently serves as the company’s rotating chairperson and deputy chairwoman, as well as CFO. 



Source: Engadget – Judge dismisses indictment against Huawei exec Meng Wanzhou

2022's 'Earthshot Prizes' Recognize Five Innovative Responses to Climate Change

“Childhood friends in Oman who figured out how to turn carbon dioxide into rock are among five winners chosen for the Prince of Wales’s prestigious Earthshot Prize,” reports the BBC:

The annual awards were created by Prince William to fund projects that aim to save the planet. Each winner will receive £1m ($1.2m) to develop their innovation…. “I believe that the Earthshot solutions you have seen this evening prove we can overcome our planet’s greatest challenges,” Prince William said during the ceremony. “By supporting and scaling them we can change our future,” he said.

1,500 projects were nominated, according to the event’s web site. Here’s the five winners:

A Kenya-based company producing stoves powered by processed biomass (made from charcoal, wood and sugarcane) that “burns cleaner, creating 90% less pollution than an open fire,” while cutting fuel costs in half.
The Indian startup behind Greenhouse-in-a-box. “Plants in the greenhouse require 98% less water than those outdoors and yields are seven-times higher,” explains the site, while the greenhouses themselves are 90% cheaper than a standard greenhouse, “more than doubling farmers’ incomes [while] using less water and fewer pesticides.”
A Queensland-based program to expand the network of rangers using drones to monitor reefs and wildfires while sharing information and innovative ideas.
London-based start-up Notpla, which created a plastic alternative made from seaweed and plants that’s entirely biodegradable. (The seaweed used in its production also captures carbon twenty-times faster than trees.)
The company 44.01 removes CO2 permanently by mineralising it in peridotite, accelerating the natural process by pumping carbonated water into peridotite underground. (Unlike carbon storage, “mineralizing” CO2 removes it forever, making the process safer, cost-effective, and scalable.)

Five prizes will be awarded each year until 2030.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – 2022’s ‘Earthshot Prizes’ Recognize Five Innovative Responses to Climate Change

The Best Ways to Fix a Leaky Air Mattress Without a Patch Kit

‘Tis the season for holiday houseguests and air mattresses. And chances are, you’ve either heard or said, “Don’t worry—we have an air mattress!” only to find out that it leaks. This discovery usually takes place late into the first night of the visit when everyone is exhausted, and just wants to go to bed.

Read more…



Source: LifeHacker – The Best Ways to Fix a Leaky Air Mattress Without a Patch Kit

Pentagon unveils B-21 Raider aircraft with advanced stealth technology

The US military has unveiled the B-21 Raider, its first new stealth bomber in 30 years. Northrop Grumman, which developed the aircraft, first showed us a silhouette of the plane covered by a shroud way back in 2015. Now, the Pentagon has officially presented the B-21 at an event at Northrop Grumman’s plant in Palmdale, California, but most of its details still remain a secret. Prior to the event, though, the company called it the “world’s first sixth-generation aircraft,” which means it’s a lot more technologically advanced than the military jets in service today.

According to ABC News, US Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin said during the event that “no other long range bomber can match [the B-21’s] efficiency.” Austin also said that “fifty years of advances in low observable technology” have gone into the aircraft and that even the most sophisticated air defense systems will have a hard time detecting a B-21 in the sky. 

The aircraft was designed using next-generation stealth technology so that it can remain undetectable even to advanced radars and air defense systems, Northrop Grumman said in a previous announcement. A Northrop Grumman official also said that the B-21 can fly in full stealth mode every day, according to Air and Space Forces Magazine, unlike the current model that needs hundreds of hours of maintenance between missions. The aircraft will use a cloud-based digital infrastructure that’s cheaper and easier maintain, and the military can also roll out rapid upgrades for separate components so that it’s always protected against evolving threats. 

Northrop Grumman is currently working on six B-21 units, which are in various stages of production, but the Air Force is expected to order at least 100 of them. The military will start testing the stealth bomber in California sometime next year before the first units go into service by mid-2020s.



Source: Engadget – Pentagon unveils B-21 Raider aircraft with advanced stealth technology

Martial Arts Game Sifu is Being Resurrected Into a Movie

Those who plays video games may recall a game from earlier this year (or, if you have a Nintendo Switch, a month ago) by the name of Sifu. Developed by Sloclap of Absolver fame, the roguelike simultaneously garnered solid reviews for its combat and criticism for how it incorporated Chinese culture and languages. Now…

Read more…



Source: Gizmodo – Martial Arts Game Sifu is Being Resurrected Into a Movie

Chinese Police are Using Cellphone Data to Track Down Protesters

CNN reports on the aftermath of last weekend’s protests against the Chinese government:

A protester told CNN they received a phone call Wednesday from a police officer, who revealed they were tracked because their cellphone signal was recorded in the vicinity of the protest site…. When they denied being there, the caller asked: “Then why did your cellphone number show up there?”

In China, all mobile phone users are required by law to register their real name and national identification number with telecom providers. The protester was also told to report to a police station for questioning and to sign a written record….

In Shanghai, where some of the boldest protests took place with crowds calling for Xi’s removal on two consecutive nights, police searched residents’ cellphones in the streets and in the subway for VPNs that can be used to circumvent China’s internet firewall, or apps such as Twitter and Telegram, which though banned in the country have been used by protesters. Police also confiscated the cellphones of protesters under arrest, according to two protesters who spoke to CNN.

A protester who was arrested over the weekend said they were told to hand over their phone and password to the police as “evidence.” They said they feared police would export the data on their phone after it was confiscated by officers, who told them they could pick it up a week later. Another protester said police returned their phone upon their release, but officers had deleted the photo album and removed the WeChat social media app.

One protester told CNN they successfully avoided being contacted by the police as of Thursady afternoon.

During the demonstration, they’d kept their phone in airplane mode.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – Chinese Police are Using Cellphone Data to Track Down Protesters

Recommended Reading: The environmental cost of China's EV boom

The dirty road to clean energy: How China’s electric vehicle boom is ravaging the environment

Antonia Timmerman, Rest of World

The rise of electric vehicles in China is causing devastating environmental impacts in nearby Indonesia, including rising ocean temperatures as a byproduct of coal plants. Upper respiratory infections are also one of the main health issues for people who live near nickel-processing factories and the main water sources for some areas are increasingly polluted and prone to flooding.

The future of parking is in New York — and it costs at least $300,000 per space

Ray Parisi, CNBC

Some of the priciest condos in NYC are housed in buildings with futuristic parking systems. Robotic technology is deployed to park and retrieve vehicles. The catch? The apartments cost millions and reserving a self-parking spot will cost you at least $300,000 more.

We’re in denial about the true cost of a Twitter implosion

Eve Fairbanks, Wired

“The amount of reputational and social wealth that stands to be lost if Twitter collapses is astounding,” Fairbanks explains. “Twitter currently functions as perhaps the world’s biggest status bank, and the investments stored in it are terrifyingly unsecured.” 



Source: Engadget – Recommended Reading: The environmental cost of China’s EV boom

Gutsy Dogs, Dueling Birds, and Other Award-Winning Animal Photos

In this collection from the 2022 Nature inFocus Photography Awards, you’ll see animals in their natural habitats—like a tiger lounging on a bed of flowers—and ones in decidedly unnatural environments, like a caterpillar in its nest of plastic or a fox in a snow-covered city. The contest received tens of thousands of…

Read more…



Source: Gizmodo – Gutsy Dogs, Dueling Birds, and Other Award-Winning Animal Photos

New CryWiper Data Wiper Targets Russian Courts, Mayor's Offices

An anonymous reader quotes a report from BleepingComputer: A previously undocumented data wiper named CryWiper is masquerading as ransomware, but in reality, destroys data beyond recovery in attacks against Russian mayor’s offices and courts. CryWiper was first discovered by Kaspersky this fall, where they say the malware was used in an attack against a Russian organization. […] CryWiper is a 64-bit Windows executable named ‘browserupdate.exe’ written in C++, configured to abuse many WinAPI function calls. Upon execution, it creates scheduled tasks to run every five minutes on the compromised machine.

Next, it contacts a command and control server (C2) with the name of the victim’s machine. The C2 responds with either a “run” or “do not run” command, determining whether the wiper will activate or stay dormant. Kaspersky reports seeing execution delays of 4 days (345,600 seconds) in some cases, likely added in the code to help confuse the victim as to what caused the infection. CryWiper will stop critical processes related to MySQL, MS SQL database servers, MS Exchange email servers, and MS Active Directory web services to free locked data for destruction.

Next, the malware deletes shadow copies on the compromised machine to prevent the easy restoration of the wiped files. CryWiper also modifies the Windows Registry to prevent RDP connections, likely to hinder intervention and incident response from remote IT specialists. Finally, the wiper will corrupt all enumerated files except for “.exe”, “.dll”, “lnk”, “.sys”, “.msi”, and its own “.CRY”, while also skipping System, Windows, and Boot directories to prevent rendering the computer completely unusable. After this step, CryWiper will generate ransom notes named ‘README.txt,’ asking for 0.5 Bitcoin (approximately $8,000) in exchange for a decrypter. Unfortunately, this is a false promise, as the corrupted data cannot be restored.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Source: Slashdot – New CryWiper Data Wiper Targets Russian Courts, Mayor’s Offices

How Chinese netizens swamped China’s Internet controls

Demonstrators cover their faces with sheets of blank paper while protesting China's zero-COVID policy in Hong Kong on November 28, 2022.

Enlarge / Demonstrators cover their faces with sheets of blank paper while protesting China’s zero-COVID policy in Hong Kong on November 28, 2022. (credit: Anthony Kwan / Getty Images)

A week ago, demonstrators took to the streets of the northwestern city of Urumqi to protest China’s strict zero-COVID policy. That night, a much bigger wave of protest crested on Chinese social media, most notably on the super app WeChat. Users shared videos of the demonstrators and songs like “Do You Hear the People Sing” from Les Misérables, Bob Marley’s “Get Up, Stand Up,” and Patti Smith’s “Power to the People.”

In the days that followed, protests spread. A mostly masked crowd in Beijing’s Liangmaqiao district held up blank sheets of paper and called for an end to tough COVID policies. Across the city at the elite Tsinghua University, protesters held up printouts of a physics formula known as the Friedmann equation because its namesake sounds like “free man.” Similar scenes played out in cities and college campuses across China in a wave of protest that has been compared to the 1989 student movement that ended in a bloody crackdown in Tiananmen Square.

Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments



Source: Ars Technica – How Chinese netizens swamped China’s Internet controls

Elon Has Restored Nearly 12,000 Banned Twitter Accounts, Data Shows

Twitter owner Elon Musk’s goal for “general amnesty” towards banned accounts is in full swing. Since taking over, the multi-billionaire owner has given thousands of once-banned users access to their accounts once again. His extreme laissez faire-attitude has attracted some of Twitter’s worst characters back to the…

Read more…



Source: Gizmodo – Elon Has Restored Nearly 12,000 Banned Twitter Accounts, Data Shows

Darknet markets generate millions in revenue selling stolen personal data

Hacker in binary code digital background. Cyber crime and internet privacy hacking. Network security, Cyber attack, Computer Virus, Ransomware, and Malware Concept. 2D illustration.

Enlarge (credit: Peach_istock via Getty Images)

It is common to hear news reports about large data breaches, but what happens once your personal data is stolen? Our research shows that, like most legal commodities, stolen data products flow through a supply chain consisting of producers, wholesalers, and consumers. But this supply chain involves the interconnection of multiple criminal organizations operating in illicit underground marketplaces.

The stolen data supply chain begins with producers—hackers who exploit vulnerable systems and steal sensitive information such as credit card numbers, bank account information, and Social Security numbers. Next, the stolen data is advertised by wholesalers and distributors who sell the data. Finally, the data is purchased by consumers who use it to commit various forms of fraud, including fraudulent credit card transactions, identity theft, and phishing attacks.

This trafficking of stolen data between producers, wholesalers, and consumers is enabled by darknet markets, which are websites that resemble ordinary e-commerce websites but are accessible only using special browsers or authorization codes.

Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments



Source: Ars Technica – Darknet markets generate millions in revenue selling stolen personal data

Intel oneDNN 3.0 Being Prepared With More Performance Optimizations

Intel’s oneAPI Deep Neural Network Library “oneDNN” is preparing to embark on its v3.0 release that improves performance not only for current and upcoming Intel hardware but also furthers along the NVIDIA and AMD support too…

Source: Phoronix – Intel oneDNN 3.0 Being Prepared With More Performance Optimizations